Category Archives: Fiction

Contains all fiction book posts.

THE KILLING FOG – Review

Litercurious Book Review

TitleThe Killing Fog
AuthorJeff Wheeler
Publisher47North (March 1, 2020)
FormatKindle, Audiobook, Paperback
Pages404
LanguageEnglish
AudienceBroad Appeal for Fantasy Readers
ASIN B07RJQPB63

AUTHOR

Jeff Wheeler is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He majored in History at the San Jose State University. He worked at Intel while attending college but retired early to write full time.

With some of his best friends, they founded the electronic magazine Deep Magic. It is a magazine where new and aspiring authors can get their fantasy and science fiction stories published.

He started his writing career self-published with Amazon’s Createspace and the Kindle Direct Program. His works caught the eye of Publisher 47North and 2013 he became one of their authors.

SYNOPSIS

Bingmei was orphaned at a very young age. Luckily, she was taken in by a kind and noble woman who just happened to be the leader of an ensign. Under Kunmia Suun’s tutelage, Bingmei continues to expand her martial arts skills. While on assignment for the local King, Bingmei unwittingly awakens a terrible ancient entity who is unleashed on the world and only she can stop it.

The story takes place in the future after all history is forgotten. No one really knows who the Ancients where, why they built the “Great Wall,” or why they disappeared. All that is known is that they left great cities and magical artifacts behind. Unfortunately, when the artifacts are used, they summon the “Killing Fog.” The fog kills everything it touches, but does not destroy anything leaving the bodies as if they were in a deep sleep.

Bingmei has a naturally ability to use magic and is an exceptional fighter. She must use all her wit, skill, and abilities to stay ahead of the ancient entity determined to capture and kill her. With the help of her friends and colleges, she embarks on a mission of survival.

CONCLUSION

The Killing Fog is a very well written book. The author established the plot and characters from the start. The imagery is exceptional and the detail exquisite. The use of China’s history intertwined with the fantasy of the future adds to the mysticism of this tale.

Jeff Wheeler obviously did a lot of research for this series. The detail in his descriptions of people, places and things are brilliant. The reader has no problem imagining the places or the people in vivid imagery. He has created a fantasy world that readers will enjoy for many years.

I genuinely enjoyed this first book in The Grave Kingdom series and I cannot wait for the next one to be released on 23 June, 2020: The Buried World.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

THE LOST WONDERLAND DIARIES – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleThe Lost Wonderland Diaries
Author/IllustratorJ. Scott Savage
PublisherShadow Mountain (Sep 8, 2020)
FormatKindle, Audiobook, Hardcover
Pages384
Language:English
ISBN 10/131629727865 / 978-1629727868

AUTHOR

J. Scott Savage is a noted author and presenter. He was a teacher and developed Common Core-aligned projects for elementary school writing curricula. He routinely presents at schools across the country inspiring the youth of today to embrace their creativity. He has been nominated for several awards. You can learn more about him on his website here.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

This book is intended for children 8-11 years old or grade level 4-6. I will testify that people of all ages will enjoy this story, as I am much older than 11 and I enjoyed this very much.

SYNOPSIS

The Lost Wonderland Diaries is a wonderful story about a young girl and her friend in Wonderland. Celia is the main character and she is dyslexic. She befriends a young boy named Tyrus who happens to be a book worm. Together they accidently get sucked into Wonderland. Their guide in Wonderland is a charming new character named Sylvan. She is a young rabbit, barely out of bunnyhood, and tasked with finding “Alice” to save Wonderland. Together they have many adventures.

Celia is the daughter of a librarian, which for her is a nightmare because of her difficulty reading. Due to her dyslexia, Celia has put more effort into learning mathematics. Tyrus is a bit of a book nerd with a giant imagination. Celia and Tyrus must combine her knowledge of math with his imagination and knowledge of books to solve puzzles and riddles while making their way through Wonderland and avoiding its hazards.

Something terrible is happening in Wonderland when they arrive. The characters are being turned into monsters! Celia, Tyrus and Sylvan must navigate a variety of hazards, puzzles and monsters not only to get home but to stop whatever is happening in Wonderland. With the help of some of the original cast of characters and a few new ones, they work their way through wonderland discovering not only what is happening, but they discover themselves in the process!

CONCLUSION

The Lost Wonderland Diaries is a magical book! J. Scott Savage does a superb job of bringing his characters to life. The story line is exceptional, intriguing, and educating. I love books that can entertain as well as teach, and this book does it all.

The little puzzles that the main characters have to solve are wonderfully crafted and educational. J. Scott Savage does a great job of introducing his readers to the problems associated with dyslexia and the difficulties coping with the disability.

I whole heartily recommend this book for anyone of all ages.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank J. Scott Savage, NetGalley and Shadow Mountain for affording me the opportunity to review The Lost Wonderland Diaries.

LITERCURIOUS CHILD FRIENDLY JOKE

Q. Why did the rabbit try to eat a diamond?

A. Because someone told him it was 2 carats.

OTHER WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR

Norman 2 – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleNorman 2: The True Story of a Possessed Doll’s Revenge
AuthorSteven Lancaster
PublisherLlewellyn Publications (September 8, 2020)
FormatKindle, Paperback
Pages264
LanguageEnglish
ASIN#B0841637W9

AUTHOR

Stephen Lancaster is a self-proclaimed phenomenologist and has been involved in the field of paranormal research since 1997. In 2010 he became an author; chronicling his experiences investigating the paranormal.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

The target audience for this publication is all those who have an interest in the paranormal and horror stories.

SYNOPSIS

Norman 2 is the sequel to Norman: The Doll That Needed to Be Locked Away. The earlier publication introduced Norman, a doll that the author and his wife discovered in a store. An ominous comment from the store owner piqued Lancaster’s interest, and he bought the doll and took it home. All too quickly, Stephen Lancaster claims, Norman began performing for his new audience. Almost immediately, sinister occurrences began to take place that forced him to utilize cameras to capture footage of the paranormal happenings. The author claims to have extensive footage relating to the possessed doll. The Lancaster’s lives become a nightmare that escalated exponentially over time. Eventually provoking the author to place the doll in a vacant room in an attempt to assuage the temper of Norman the doll. 

It is now two years later and Norman 2 continues the haunting tale. As the saying goes, sensational claims require sensational proof and that seems to be where the wheels come of this project. I am only too aware that paranormal investigators claim that their methods are based in science but that just isn’t so. The scientific method requires a number of things: for example, the experiment is repeatable producing the same result. In addition, it must be possible for your peers to replicate the same experiment and attempt to prove your theory wrong. In the paranormal world it is impossible to find irrefutable proof derived from the scientific method.

In Norman 2 Lancaster attempts to prove with visual evidence the voracity of his claims. I remain skeptical as I felt the events described fell short of proof of paranormal occurrences.

Lancaster recounts various disturbing situations including a seemingly spontaneous fire claimed to have been created by Norman in its room. There are instances of exaggerations or sensational claims that reduce, rather than increase the probity of the claims. The telling of the story reminded me of the over elaboration of a bad liar. I came to the uncomfortable conclusion that I was being lied to.

CONCLUSION

Throughout the book there were examples of repetition, misspellings and an amateurish writing style. This devalued the trope almost as much as the outlandish claims themselves. The work could have been far more concise and measured. I found myself being less subjective in part due to the lack of skilled writing, language, grammar, and vocabulary. 

If the family are so afraid of the doll it seems odd that they should wish to continue to house it in their home. Is the doll inhabited by a restless spirit, a demon, or the soul of a dead child? That question I leave for you to decide.

I am aware the force of my review may indicate I do not enjoy the entertainment value of paranormal entertainment shows and literature. I am intrigued with the subject and have been since I read The Amityville Horror as a child. I consumed the book in less than 24 hours, not stopping to sleep until I finished it. 

Incidentally, I do enjoy reading publications on the paranormal, especially when they are well written, balanced, and subjective. I enjoy paranormal literature that present the claims and evidence that leave it for me to decide if the claims carry any weight or not.

This is simply my opinion and you have your own and that is why I recommend you read the first book and then decide if you would like reading Norman 2

Rating: 2 out of 5.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Steven Lancaster, NetGalley and Llewellyn Publications for affording me the opportunity to review Norman 2: The True Story of a Possessed Doll’s Revenge.

OTHER BOOKS BY THIS AUTHOR

SPOOKS AND KNOCKERS UNCENSORED IS CURRENTLY FREE TO READ on KindleUnlimited

STELLA ENDICOTT AND THE ANYTHING-IS-POSSIBLE POEM – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleStella Endicott and the
Anything-Is-Possible Poem
Author/IllustratorKate DiCamillo / Chris Van Dusen
PublisherCandlewick Press (June 2020)
FormatKindle, Audiobook, Hardcover
Pages96
LanguageEnglish
ASINB07ZRCKGC6

AUTHOR

Katrina Elizabeth DiCamillo is an accomplished author and is known for her fictional children’s books. She is one of six people to win the Newberry Medal twice. She was appointed the U.S. National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature by the Library of Congress for the term 2014 and 2015. She writes novels, chapter books, picture books and short stories. Several of her stories have been made into motion pictures. You can visit Kate’s website here.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem is written for children 5-10 years old.  

SYNOPSIS

Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem is the story of a young second grader and her antagonist Horace. Stella is an imaginative young girl who likes to fantasize about wizards and castles. Horace is the obnoxious know-it-all that every class has. The two are at ends on most things, but everything unravels when they start arguing in class.

The two get sent to the Principles office but Horace runs off. Stella gives chase and then things go really bad. They have to bind together and provide each other comfort to escape their ordeal.

CONCLUSION

Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem is a very good book. It provides education and storytelling all in one. The characters are well crafted and believable. The plot is suspenseful and intellectual. The prose is age appropriate and easily to follow. There is the heroine and the antagonist and circumstance forces them to work together. The end of story lesson is relevant and educational.

The illustrations in this pre-release are not the final press release pictures. That said, they are splendid. Chris is an excellent artist and his characters are beautifully rendered. If the final release is anything like the cover, then this will be a delightfully colored picturesque book. I do love the pig and “balloon head Horace.”

Overall, Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem is an excellent book. Children will absolutely love this story and its characters. When the final release is complete, I have no doubt that the illustrations will only add to the appeal of this little gem.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

SPECIAL MENTION – ILLISTRATOR

Chris Van Dusen is an accomplished author and illustrator. He started drawing when he was a child living in Portland, Maine. Back then he loved drawing aliens, monsters and robots. He attended the University of Massachusetts where he earned a BFA in 1982. He did a few odd jobs after graduation but finally started freelance drawing cartoons and illustrations for magazines. He published his first book in 2000. If you would like to learn more about Chris, you can find his website here, and you can watch his drawing tutorials here or catch him on Facebook here.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Kate DiCamillo and Candlewick Press for affording me the opportunity to review Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem.

LITERCURIOUS CHILD FRIENDLY JOKE

Q. Do you know why Humpty Dumpty likes Autumn so much?

A. He had a great fall.

OTHER BOOKS BY THIS AUTHOR

HERBIE AND THE T. REX – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleHerbie and the T. Rex
Author/IllustratorCharlotte Sebag-Montefiore / Anita Schmidt
PublisherOlympia Publishers (26 Mar. 2020)
FormatKindle, Paperback
Pages30
Language:English
ISBN 10/131788304977 / 978-1788304979

AUTHOR

This is the third book in Charlotte Sebag-Montefiore’s repertoire.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

Herbie and the T. Rex is written for children 2-6 years old.  

SYNOPSIS

Herbie and the T. Rex is a short children’s story about “Herbie the Herbivore” and his friends. They go out together to get some nice leaves to eat when they are set upon by a T. Rex. Herbie and his friends have to think fast to get out of this situation.

CONCLUSION

This book is very nicely illustrated. Anita Schmidt did a wonderful job depicting the dinosaurs and the scenes. The drawings are age appropriate, colorful and delightful.   

Herbie and the T. Rex starts off slowly but the plot develops rapidly. As the T. Rex approaches Herbie and his friends, Sebag-Montefiore includes an element of suspense into the story. However, the story line is disjointed and doesn’t flow well.

I wish Herbie had made friends with the T. Rex because I don’t want to teach a 2-6 year old child that violence is the first answer to a bully. Furthermore, some of the vocabulary used is not age appropriate.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5.

SPECIAL MENTION – ILLUSTRATOR

Anita Schmidt is a mother of two and lives near the Baltic Sea in northern Germany. She studied graphic design and now works with Bright Children’s Authors and Illustrators.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Charlotte Sebag-Montefioreand Olympia Publishers for affording me the opportunity to review Herbie and the T. Rex.

LITERCURIOUS CHILD FRIENDLY JOKE

Q. Why couldn’t the teddy bear finish his dinner?

A. Because he was already stuffed.

THE TOOTH QUEEN – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleThe Tooth Queen
AuthorNeil A. Ewart
PublisherOlympia Publishers (26 Mar. 2020)
FormatKindle, Paperback
Pages23
LanguageEnglish
ISBN 10/131788304055 / 978-1788304054

AUTHOR

Find out about Neil A. Ewart on his publishers web-site here.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

The Tooth Queen is written for children 5-7 years old.  

SYNOPSIS

The Tooth Queen is a very short children’s story. It relates the trials and tribulations of the Tooth Fairy and her work for the “evil tooth queen.”

It explains in a magical way, why it’s important not to have tooth decay.

CONCLUSION

This book is very well scripted and flows nicely. It is written in a rhyming prose, and the illustrations are both colorful and vibrant. Neil uses his story telling not merely to entertain but to educate. In this case he is advocating proper tooth care in a way that young children will easily understand.

I especially liked the picture puzzle. I had to go back through the book to find all of the pictures, which was very entertaining. Children will absolutely love this book.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Neil A. Ewart and Olympia Publishers for affording me the opportunity to review The Tooth Queen.

LITERCURIOUS CHILD FRIENDLY JOKE

Q. What does the Tooth Fairy use to fix a broken wand?

A.  Why tooth paste, of course.

PETER AND THE DWARF PLANETS – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitlePeter and the Dwarf Planets
Author/IllustratorStephen J. Alexander / Laura Coppolaro
PublisherOlympia Publishers (August 30, 2018)
FormatKindle, Paperback
Pages26
Language:English
ISBN 10/131788301412 / 978-1788301411

AUTHOR

Stephen J. Alexander is an educator and author. You can learn more about this author here, visit his Facebook page here or see him on twitter @DwarfPlanets5.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?

Peter and the Dwarf Planets is written for children 5-11 years old.  

SYNOPSIS

Peter and the Dwarf Planets is a bedtime story for children. It relates the adventures of a father and his son, Peter, exploring the solar system.  The father, Daddy, is speaking with Peter about the different planets when the subject of dwarf planets comes up. As Peter starts to drift off to sleep, he imagines a great space adventure with Daddy. They travel together checking out all of the planets on their way out to Pluto.

CONCLUSION

Peter and the Dwarf Planets is a very short book. The story starts in a rhyming fashion, losses it for a couple of pages in the middle, and then rhymes to the end. The flow is easy and great for small children. It teaches kids about planets, dwarf planets, and our solar system while entertaining them.

The illustrations by Laura Coppolaro are very nice. They are colorful, fun, and appealing. They make the book a joy to look at while reading. A child can use their imagination while viewing the pictures and reading/hearing the story.

Overall, this book is a joy to read. Anyone will love sharing this story with their young children at bedtime. I only wish it were a little longer. I can’t wait to see what Peter and Daddy get up to next.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

SPECIAL MENTION – ILLUSTRATOR

Laura Coppolaro is a professional illustrator. You can find her on Facebook here or if you have need of her skills, you can contact her here. Her LinkedIn page is located here.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Stephen J. Alexander and Olympia Publishers for affording me the opportunity to review Peter and the Dwarf Planets.

LITERCURIOUS CHILD FRIENDLY JOKE

Q. Why don’t bears wear shoes?

A. Because they have bear feet.

 

TEN FINGERS TOUCHING – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

TitleTen Fingers Touching
AuthorEllen A. Roth MFA
PublisherGetting to the Point, Inc.; First edition (April 12, 2015)
Pages110
LanguageEnglish
ASIN #B00W1XABD0

AUTHOR

Ellen A. Roth MFA is the author of Ten Fingers Touching. You can find out all about her here

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE? 

Anyone who enjoys a heartwarming tale sprinkled with love and adventure in equal measure set against the fight between good and evil.

SYNOPSIS

Ten Fingers Touching is a well crafted and sculpted story written by a consummate professional in the person of Ellen A. Roth.

Roth has managed to combine a romance within the epic struggle between the honorable and the malevolent, skillfully woven with a surprising conclusion.

Whilst a brief tale, the story has something for everyone; ethical dilemmas, copious moments of adventure, love interest, and plenty of mystery.

One cannot comment on Roth’s exquisite manuscript without mention of the simply magnificent illustrations produced by John Blumen. Obviously, John completely understood what was required artistically to further enhance a most beautiful fairy-tale. Collectively they make a stunning combination and a spectacular book.

Whilst the story is concise at 110 pages in length it left me wanting to read more. I sincerely hope that Roth follows up with a second offering in the near future. I for one, will be in the queue to purchase a copy.   

CONCLUSION

Ten Fingers Touching was a joy to discover. It left me with a warm fuzzy feeling that is frequently lacking in many of today’s tales. I enjoyed following the well crafted characters and frankly, I never wanted the tale to conclude. It was engaging throughout and left me wanting more.

A beautifully crafted love story in the midst of adversity with a twist in its tale.

Ten Fingers Touching is a steal at the price right now on Amazon. It is flying off the shelves. I strongly recommend snatching up your copy while they’re still available. It would make an ideal gift for anyone over 10 years old.

London A-Z – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Review

London A-Z
London A-Z
TitleLondon A-Z                           
AuthorGeographer’s A-Z Map Co.      
PublisherHunter Publishing: Geographers A-Z Map Co. Ltd. (6th Ed., October 30, 2006     
FormatPaperback     
Page288     
LanguageLanguage     
ISBN #1843483289 ISBN-13 (978-1843483281)    

Author’s Bio

The Geographer’s A-Z Map is the registered author of this 6th Edition publication; a paperback, dated: 30thOctober 2006.

Who is the target audience?

Those considering studying “The Knowledge” would be the first that would come to mind when considering who would benefit from this paperback. That said anyone wanting to know how to find anything in London would be well advised to get one.

Synopsis

The London A-Z, I know her well. 

I continue to use traditional methods of locating the places I wish to travel. I find looking at a  page of the London A-Z allows me at a glance to find the path I want to take. I avoid the constant directions of an electronic voice dictating the one and only route to a destination. I live for the times I get lost and find strange and interesting locations with intriguing back stories. I am not a technophobe; in fact I am an advanced user, designer, and educator in technology related subjects. I prefer my choice of directions and those happy times where I occasionally meet people or accidentally visit places that would have been missed if I used my GPS. 

Then there is the utility of humor built into reference materials such as the London A-Z. I have been known to flip through to the index of the book and look up the funny or unusual names contained therein. These names vary from crude and lascivious names from the deep and distant past of London. Names that echo from the Saxon roots, Roman street names, and the place names inspired by the work people did at that location in times now past.  The back stories of many of the locations you can find in the index of the London A-Z can be fascinating and add to your lexicon of humorous tales or intriguing myths to discuss with those who find such matters interesting. For example there is a place called Bleeding Heart Yard, you can find it in East Central 1 (EC1). It is in Clerkenwell and is reported to be so named owing to a murder that happened there in the year 1626. It turns out however, that the woman reputed to have been murdered actually died 20 years later and not of natural causes. If you are a reader of Charles Dickens work you may recall the case; he included in his book The Little Dorrit. 

Not far from the Tower of London there is a street named Knightrider Street  (Knyghriderstrete in 1322 language). The street is named after the knights that would traverse this area from the Tower old London to Jousting tournaments in Smithfeilds. Then there is the plethora of funny, licentious, and salacious Public House and place names; for example there is Wardrobe Place in EC4. It was at this location that King Edward 3rd housed his walk-in wardrobe. Sadly, the building was destroyed in the now infamous Great Fire of London 1666. Then there is Cock Lane, EC1, a wonderful erection if I do say so myself. Cock Lane is another, all be it humorous, example of a place name that has relevance to the trade plied there in the past. Cock Lane was the only street in the City (City of London, The square mile, a private corporation) where ladies of the evening were allowed to live and work. Last but not least there is Hanging Sword Alley in EC4. In medieval times most of the country was illiterate and so there was no naming or numbering of houses, they preferred instead to use symbols. In the case of a coffee house there would often be a ladies arm holding a coffee pot. At the house on Hang Sword Lane there was a mansion and they used a hanging sword as their symbol. The area was known for fighting schools and as a rough place to visit which is probably why the Blood Bowl Alley came to be named. Again those of you familiar with Dickens work will find a reference to such places in A Tale of Two Cities in the form of Jerry Cruncher body-snatcher. 

I suggest if you are bored and in search of adventure, turn off your GPS get yourself a London A-Z and go and lose yourself for a few hours in London. Visit the places you never knew existed and perhaps find your other self.  

Always remember that a book can be much more than its cover.

Conclusion

Be it the times of Pax Romanaus or Pax Britainica always have your trusty and reliable cartographic entertainment on your person, because you never know when you’ll need the London A-Z.

Everything’s Eventual – REVIEW

Litercurious Book Reviews

TitleEverything’s Eventual                                             
AuthorStephen King                                         
PublisherScribner Reprint (April 17, 2018)     
FormatPaperback, Kindle, Hardcover, Audiobook           
Page464     
LanguageEnglish     
ISBN #1501197967     

Author’s Bio

The eponymous Mr. King, the author of a library of horror genre literature really needs no introduction, but just in case you spent the last 50 years on a meteor traversing the universe, I will give you the press junket introduction. Stephen King, is the child of a school teacher. It was Mrs. King who encouraged all of her children to read. Stephen King consumed literature like a man possessed. This compulsion continued through-out his life and even directed his choice of study as a young man. Whilst in academia he began writing professionally. He sold his early works for a pittance but as his skill and reputation continued, he became a much-loved horror writer of modern times. At the time of writing, Stephen King’s name is synonymous with the horror theme. Some people describe him as the King of Horror and it is hard to deny with his sky-high book sales. As this is Halloween it might be pertinent to mention that one particular story was inspired by paranormal events experienced by him and his spouse in a hotel in Colorado. King has spoken of it in the past and I encourage you to seek out his own account for more details.

Who will enjoy this collection of stories?

If you are looking for a read that disquieting, amusing at times, and frightening at others this could be a book for you this Halloween. King will take you on a sojourn into an alternative universe where things may not be as you imagine. He can take you from a hospital gurney to conversing with the Devil in the woods. Every story in this novella has something for everyone. If you aren’t a Stephen King fan already, perhaps this volume could turn you into one.

Synopsis

Everything‘s Eventual is one of many of King’s Novella’s. In my opinion, whilst this is not his greatest, it is not his worst. The series of stories span a wide gamut of characters and storylines, as you expect from a novella. What is special about this collection of stories is the expertise of the author in crafting the characters so well you can almost smell them.  The stories are so well described that you could be accompanying the characters as they transverse the plots.  One cannot help but be impressed by the sheer latitude of King’s vivid imagination. The stories are original and explore new aspects of terror. If you enjoyed King’s earlier work, such as Carrie, Salem’s Lot, or Joyland you will love this outing. My favorite of the bunch is 1408, or perhaps it is Riding the Bullet; no, it has to be Luckey Quarter.  

Conclusion

Everything’s Eventual was nearly 10 years in the coming preceded by King’s earlier novella Dreamscapes and Nightmares, and it is eminently comparable. In short, if you enjoyed the latter, you will love the former. The perfect Halloween read.